Magazine

Organic rapeseed
from
Austria.

Gudrun Bertignoll is a
self-employed nutrition scientist
from Garsten and offers
advice, workshops and presentations.

Her recipe
for a balanced diet:
You mix 300 g of preference,
a large portion of common sense,
¼ litre of enjoyment, 500 g of time,
a pinch of nutritional knowledge and
a dash of creativity with lots of
high-quality regional foods.
That’s it.

HER MOTTO: DON’T EAT ANYTHING THAT YOUR GRANNY WOULDN’T HAVE RECOGNISED AS FOOD OR, TO PUT IT IN A BETTER WAY, DON’T EAT IT TOO OFTEN AT LEAST! LOOK EXACTLY AT WHERE YOUR FOOD COMES FROM AND ENJOY YOUR FOOD! DON’T FORGET TO BE ACTIVE AND ENJOY YOUR LIFE!

www.gudrun-bertignoll.at

BECAUSE
NOT ALL OIL
IS THE SAME!

Fats often have a bad reputation and are written off as fattening food – true to the motto: “No fat at all!” Yet fats play an important role when it comes to our health, unfortunately this role is often underestimated. As is often the case in life, the same principle applies to fats: Quality over quantity. Domestic rapeseed oil in particular should not be missing on any plate, thanks to its valuable contents. Let’s look at it more closely, under the nutritional physiology microscope so to say.


How are fats classified?

To understand the particularity of rapeseed oil, it’s worth taking a quick look into the world of biochemistry. Fats consist of fatty acids and are divided into different groups according to

  • the chain length (short, medium and long-chain fatty acids),
  • the type of bond (saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fatty acids) and
  • the necessity of intake through food (essential or non-essential).

Saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids can be formed by the body itself without difficulty and are a very good source of energy. That means in this case: “Less is more”.

The long-chain, polyunsaturated fatty acids also have a special importance for our health. These essential fatty acids include Omega 3 and Omega 6..

What does essential mean?

Indispensable! The body cannot produce these fatty acids and relies on their intake. This regular supply of the body with essential fatty acids plays an especially crucial role for our health. Omega 6 fatty acids regulate the water permeability of the skin. Omega 3 fatty acids have an anti-inflammatory effect, they are valuable components of the brain and nerve cells, they have a positive effect on the cardiovascular system and much more.

What makes rapeseed oil so special?

The rapeseed oil provides many essential fatty acids in the right ratio. In the reality of life for many people today, this is particularly important. We spend the majority of our time sitting down. We often don’t move enough. This means that it is important to keep an eye on the calories we consume each day and choose the right oil. Rapeseed oil.

You have to consider: Fats have more than twice as many calories as carbohydrate and protein. This can contribute to an increased intake of energy.

  • One quarter (24.4 %) of rapeseed oil is made up of the indispensable polyunsaturated fatty acids! By comparison, olive oil only has approx. 9 %.
  • An increased intake of long-chain Omega 3 fatty acids reduces the triglyceride levels and the blood pressure, which reduces the risk of coronary heart disease.
  • Polyunsaturated fatty acids have a positive effect on your cholesterol level, as they reduce LDL cholesterol.
  • Rapeseed oil contains 23.3 mg vitamin E per 100 g – this is more than double as much as olive oil contains. Vitamin E is an important antioxidant and protects our cells.
  • Rapeseed oil provides many Omega 3 fatty acids. You would have to eat 1.5 kg of trout to obtain the same quantity of Omega 3 fatty acids in one tablespoon (10 g) of rapeseed oil!
  • Rapeseed oil can be heated to a relatively high temperature (smoking point: 165 °C)
  • It tastes good!
  • Rapeseed oil has the ideal ratio of Omega 3 to Omega 6 fatty acids and is therefore perfectly suitable for athletes and children.

Rapeseed oil has the ideal ratio? What does that mean?

A particular feature here is, again, the Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids. Both fatty acids have their importance, but it is all about the right ratio – and here, rapeseed oil is one step ahead! Omega 3 fatty acids have an anti-inflammatory effect, Omega 6 fatty acids, however, are “pro-inflammatory”. The important thing is for the ratio to be correct. For every 1 g of “good” Omega 3 fatty acids, you should have a maximum of 5 g of “bad” Omega 6 fatty acids in one oil. This the nutritional physiology recommendation. Rapeseed oil has a ratio of 1:2.6! Rapeseed oil is therefore more than recommended! By comparison: Sunflower oil has a ratio of 1:120!

 

Enjoy the taste of HERMANN products and enjoy the positive effects on your health as well.